Your Shaky Knees 2018 Homework

Mt Joy:

  • If you like: Jimmy Eat World
  • When: Sunday @ 12:00 pm
  • Where: Peachtree

If this band had formed fifteen years ago they’d have been emo.  Their modern form is a soulful combination of folk and pop-rock.  Mt Joy is writing singalong songs about the existential crises that come from being a suddenly famous indie band, or just a 20 - 30-something in general, in a way that manages to be less melodramatic than its subject matter.

Welles:

  • If you like: Queens of the Stone Age or Jack White
  • When: Friday @ 1:00 pm
  • Where: Piedmont

In a sea of indie-rock and art-rock Welles is just straight rock.  He looks like he stepped right out of the 90s grunge era as though pulled forward through time by our need to head-bang to some no frills, guitar driven jams.  He’s gritty, and a little psychedelic at times, and is likely to be one of the purest sets of the festival.

Bayonne:

  • If you like: Fleet Foxes or Lord Huron
  • When: Saturday @ 12:00 pm
  • Where: Piedmont

Hearing the way this composer creates delicate floating melodies we have a sneaking suspicion that he’s listened to a lot of Sufjan Stevens.  There’s a digital element to Bayonne’s music, but it comes off more classical and ambient than electronica.  If you’re looking for something that sounds the way a spring afternoon feels this is the set for you.

Liz Brasher:

  • If you like: Courtney Barnett or Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats
  • When: Friday @ 12:00 pm
  • Where: Ponce De Leon

This blues-rock artist has a lot of buzz around her.  Brasher’s debut EP will be out the weekend before Shaky Knees.  The two tracks she’s released so far promise soulful tunes that are built around her 1940’s American Blues Standards vocal style, and we can’t think of a better way to kick off the weekend.

Sir Sly:

  • If you like:  Matt & Kim or Manchester Orchestra
  • When: Sunday @ 2:00 pm
  • Where: Piedmont

Last year it seemed Shaky Knees dedicated a whole day to indie electronica.  Not so much this year, but if you’re into that Sir Sly has got your fix.  There’s a dark quality to their music even though it is clearly dance music.  We expect to see an energized crowd clapping along like it is some new form of gospel.